In the past two years, two states have legalized human composting. Multiple States are beginning to propose the idea. Is it legal in Minnesota?

Growing up, I watched a lot of horror movies. My dad was a big fan of zombies, so I spent many hours watching classics such as 'Night Of The Living Dead', 'Dawn Of The Dead', 'Re-animator', and so on. Besides being slightly scared of a zombie apocalypse, I always thought of "what happens when there's no more room for bodies in cemeteries?"

Apparently, I'm not the only one that has had this thought. According to an article from CBC radio, many people around the world are asking the same question. One quote that stuck out to me from the article was "the shrinking of open spaces has put the future of cemeteries in jeopardy".

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I then came across a reddit post that there was a bill to propose human composting in Minnesota. I immediately knew I had to learn more about this.

Apparently there the bill was proposed last year. There were actually two of them and they were proposed two days apart, according to Bill Track 50.

  • Human remains conversion to basic elements using natural organic reduction permitted - A bill for an act relating to mortuary science; permitting the conversion of human remains to basic elements using natural organic reduction
  • Conversion of human remains to basic elements using natural organic reduction permission - A bill for an act relating to mortuary science; permitting the conversion of human remains to basic elements using natural organic reduction

Slightly different names, but with the same exact meanings. They were both shot down, but it did intrigue me.

Human composting or Natural Organic Reduction is a method where un-embalmed remains are processed and turned into soil. Essentially the body would be broken down with organic materials like wood chips or straw, until it becomes soil.

According to Popular Science, This process is already legalized in Washington and Colorado. It also looks like Maine, Oregon and California are looking into the eco-friendly method as well.

No word on if it will be proposed again, but it does seem like an interesting concept. I found a video from a human composting facility that does a good job of diving into everything that goes into it. Check it out below:

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